Farm Credit
Aug 02 2017

’17 Scholarship & Showmanship

Purina Mills’ Scholarship Deadline & Showmanship Contest Rapidly Approaching

November 3, 2017, is the deadline to apply for the annual scholarships awarded by Purina Mills and the New Mexico Cattle Growers Association’s (NMCGA’s) Young Cattlemen’s Leadership Committee (YCLC).

“We are pleased to be able to offer these scholarships once again, and appreciate Purina Mills and our Allied Industries Committee making it possible,” said Pat Boone, NMCGA President, Elida.  “We have some great young people in New Mexico agriculture, and want help them as much as possible as they look to the future.” 

The $1,000 Purina Mills scholarship will be awarded to a New Mexico student who is a member of the NMCGA, the New Mexico Junior Cattle Growers Association, or the child of an NMCGA member.  Graduating high school seniors, and college freshmen, sophomores and juniors in good academic standing are eligible to apply for the award.  In addition, the Young Cattlemen’s Leadership Committee and the Allied Industries Committee will also be presenting two $500 scholarships – one to a high school senior and one to a continuing college student – at this same time.

“College can be very expensive for students and their families.  We are pleased to be able to offer these scholarships and encourage all eligible students to apply,” Boone said.  “We want to help NMCGA members and their families continue their education and hopefully return to the agriculture business.”

The three scholarships will be presented to the top three applicants during the Joint Stockmen’s Convention slated for November 30 through December 3, 2017 at the Crowne Plaza Hotel in Albuquerque.

NMCGA is also excited to be hosting the 10th Annual Showmanship Contest at the New Mexico State Fair on Sunday, September 10th immediately following the New Mexico Breeders Classic Steer and Heifer show that begins at 1:00 p.m. There will be three divisions this year with buckles being awarded to each division winner.  Divisions are broken by age groups, (age of youth as of January 1, 2017): Division 1) 9 to 11 Division 2) 12 to 13 and Division 3) 14 to 19 years of age.

For more information please contact the NMCGA office at 505.247.0584 or via email at nmcga@nmagriculture.org

 

Download Application here.

 

Resources & Forms

Scholarship Form          Showmanship Contest Entry Form

 

 

Jun 12 2017

NMDA to hold public rule hearings across New Mexico

For Immediate Release: June 13, 2017

Contact: Shelby Herrera

575-646-3007 office

(LAS CRUCES, N.M.) –  The New Mexico Department of Agriculture will hold public hearings in four locations across the state to discuss the adoption and amendment of two rules.

The hearings will be held to propose the repeal and adoption of 21.15.1 NMAC – “Organic Agriculture,” and amendments to 21.34.3 NMAC “Pasteurized Milk Ordinance,” and receive public comment on each proposal.

The hearings will be as follows:

  • In Las Cruces at the New Mexico Department of Agriculture, on Wednesday, July 5, 2017 from 1–2 p.m., and 2:30–3:30 p.m.
  • In Portales at the Roosevelt County Extension Office on Thursday, July 6, 2017 from 2–3 p.m., and 3:30–4:30 p.m.
  • In Santa Fe at the State Capitol building in room 326, on Friday, July 7, 2017 from 8–9 a.m., and 9:30–10:30 a.m.
  • In Albuquerque at the Bernalillo County Extension Office, on Friday, July 7, 2017 from 1–2 p.m., and 2:30–3:30 p.m.

During the Organic Agriculture hearings, the new fee structure for the Department’s Organic Program will be proposed.

During the Pasteurized Milk Ordinance hearings amendments will be proposed. These amendments add a reference to additional documents that are used to regulate milk and milk products in New Mexico.

The Organic rule hearings will be held first at each location, with the Pasteurized Milk Ordinance rule hearings to follow.

A copy of the proposed rule is available on the webpage at www.nmda.nmsu.edu, or at the New Mexico Department of Agriculture located at 3190 S. Espina, Las Cruces, NM 88003.

Apr 13 2017

NMCGA Graduate Scholarship

Here’s The Moos….              For Immediate Release – April 12, 2017

Application Deadline Approaching for Cattle Growers’ Graduate Scholarship

            June 1 is the deadline to apply for the New Mexico Cattle Growers’ Association’s (NMCGA’s) Young Cattlemen’s Leadership Committee (YCLC) $1000 Graduate Scholarship.

            “With this scholarship, we want to help young people who come from an agricultural background further their education,” said Pat Boone, NMCGA President, Elida.  “As they pursue those advanced degrees, we hope to also broaden production agriculture awareness in non-typical agricultural fields.”

            Applicants must be New Mexico residents, have a background in beef cattle production, and pursuing a post-graduate degree.  Financial need will be considered, but is not a prerequisite.  Preference will be given to NMCGA members and their families.

            “We encourage all interested students to apply,” said Boone.  “There’s nothing easy – financially or otherwise – about post-graduate studies, and we want to do all we can to help students who are making that effort.”

            Applications must be received in the NMCGA office by June 1, 2017.  They should be sent to: New Mexico Cattle Growers’ Association, Attention: Graduate Scholarship Committee, P.O. Box 7517, Albuquerque, NM  87194.  The scholarship will be awarded at the NMCGA’s Mid-Year Meeting, scheduled for June 19-21 in Ruidoso.

The NMCGA has represented the ranchers in New Mexico and the West since 1914 and has members in all 33 of the state’s counties as well as some 19 other states. The Association participates in venues necessary to protect beef producers and private property rights including litigation, state and federal legislation and regulatory affairs. 

For further information, contact:  Caren Cowan

505.247.0584 phone / nmcga@nmagriculture.org 

 

Application Link: 17graduatescholarship_Application

Apr 12 2017

Santa Fe National Forest Open House Dates

The Santa Fe National Forest (SFNF) is revising its Land and Resource Management Plan (Forest Plan), which will guide management of all forest resources for 10 to 15 years.

Summer Open House dates, 1-3:30 p.m. 

Thursday, April 27, at the Walatowa Visitor Center

  • Topics: Heritage, Tribal Relations, and Forest Plan
  • Address: 7413 NM-4, Jemez Pueblo, NM 87024

Monday, May 15, at the Supervisor’s Office

  • Topics: Engineering, Wildlife, and Forest Plan
  • Address: 11 Forest Lane, Santa Fe, NM 87508

Monday, May 15, at the Mesa Public Library

  • Topics: Recreation, Tribal Relations, and Forest Plan
  • Address: 2400 Central Ave, Los Alamos, NM 87544

Wednesday, June 21, at the Coyote District Office

  • Topics: Grazing, Heritage, and Forest Plan
  • Address: State Hwy 96, Drive 1707, Coyote, NM 87012

Tuesday, July 18, at the Supervisor’s Office

  • Topics: Grazing, Recreation, and Forest Plan
  • Address: 11 Forest Lane, Santa Fe, NM 87508

Tuesday, July 18, Pecos High School (School Board Rm)

  • Topics: Archaeology, Forest Plan, and TBD
  • Address: 28 Panther Pkwy, Hwy 63 N, Pecos NM 87552

Wednesday, August 16, at the Cuba District Office

  • Topics: Archaeology, Oil & Gas, and Forest Plan
  • Address: 04b, County Road 11, Cuba, NM 87013

 

There will not be a presentation or an agenda at the Open Houses. It is a casual opportunity to engage with Forest Service specialists about Forest Plan Revision.

You can arrive any time, stay for as little or long as you like, and can circulate among Forest Service specialists discussing various resources.

Open Houses are not part of a comment period so there will not be any recording of public comments, but specialists may take informal notes during conversations.

SFNF will bring their current work to share with you and answer your questions, but they will be reviewing pre-draft material which will not be made available to the public either as a handout or on our website. This is an informal, intermediary step. They will bring handouts from previous public meetings, which are available on their website, and there will be opportunities later for public comment on draft work products.

If you have questions please call 505-438-5442, email santafeforestplan@fs.fed.us, or mail: Forest Plan Revision, Santa Fe National Forest, 11 Forest Lane, Santa Fe, NM 87508. To learn more, please visit our website:  www.fs.usda.gov/goto/santafeforestplan.

 

Apr 12 2017

Cattle Growers’ Push for Monument Elimination

Here’s The Moos….                 For Immediate Release / April 12, 2017

The New Mexico Cattle Growers’ Association (NMCGA) is urging President Donald J. Trump to address the abusive monument designations made in past administrations, according to the group’s President Pat Boone, Elida.

In an early April letter to Congressman Steve Pearce, the NMCGA asked the Congressman to bring the New Mexico monuments to the President’s attention.     

“I know of few that don’t want the best for the land,” Boone said. “But putting layer after layer of bureaucratic designations isn’t often what is best for the land and its’ creatures.”

“Ranchers and other agriculturists have been managing lands in New Mexico for more than 14 generations. If it wasn’t for that stewardship, there likely wouldn’t be pristine lands available today,” he continued.

“We all remember visiting monument designations across the country as youngsters and we enjoy sharing those places with our children and grandchildren today,” Boone noted. “These sights are of a reasonable size for all to enjoy.”

“Unfortunately more recent monument designations starting back in 1996 with the Grand Staircase Escalante in Utah that encompasses 1,880,461 acres appear to be about controlling the land rather than conserving special places,” he said.

The Organ Mountains-Desert Peaks National Monument takes 776 square miles, or about 25 percent of Dona Ana County, New Mexico, according to Boone. There are several entire ranches within the monument designation.

An additional concern with this huge amount of land is border security, Boone noted. Both the Border Patrol and local law enforcement concerns were unheeded with the Dona Ana County designation.

The federal Antiquities Act requires that “the smallest area compatible with the proper care and management of the objects to be protected.” The act was designed to protect federal lands and resources quickly, according to a Congressional Research Service (CRS) report issue in early September, 2016.

“It doesn’t seem to me that these vast designations meet the letter, spirit or intent of the law,” Boone said.

Furthermore, after three (3) years, the Bureau of Land Management has yet to come up with a plan or guidance on how the Organ Mountains-Desert Peaks are to be managed as a monument, he added.

Congressman Pearce fully understood the impacts of such a huge designation in Dona Ana County and attempted to reduce the size of the monument to about 60,000 acres prior to the monster designation by President Obama, Boone pointed out.

 The CRS says that presidents have proclaimed a total of 151 monuments. Congress has modified many of these proclamations and has abolished some monuments. Congress also has created monuments under its own authority.

These monster designations are not limited to New Mexico, with many other Western states suffering from vast monument designations as well, Boone explained.

“We sincerely hope that President Trump will consider the people who live and work on the land as he addresses monuments,” Boone concluded, “and that he takes action to eliminate harmful designations.”

 

For further information, contact:  Caren Cowan

505.247.0584 phone / nmcga@nmagriculture.org

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