Farm Credit
Mar 05 2018

Youth Ranch Management Camp

Time to Apply for NMSU’s New Mexico Youth Ranch Management Camp

For six years teenagers have learned the science behind ranching at the New Mexico Youth Ranch Management Camp conducted by New Mexico State University’s College of Agricultural, Consumer and Environmental Sciences.

Now is the time for youth ages 15 to 19 to apply for a life-changing experience at the June 10 through 15 camp where they will be introduced to the many aspects of running a ranch, from financial statements and marketing strategies to producing quality beef and managing natural resources and wildlife.

Online registration deadline is April 15. Visit nmyrm.nmsu.edu for more information and to register. A total of 30 participants will be invited to this year’s camp with three of the openings reserved for out-of-state youth.

The camp is held at the CS Cattle Company’s 130,000-acre ranch at the foot of the Sangre de Cristo mountain range near Cimarron.

“This location allows our campers to see a real-life working ranch,” said camp director Jack Blandford, NMSU Cooperative Extension Service program director in Luna County. “The CS, a cattle and hunting operation, has been family owned and operated since 1873.”

Collaboration between NMSU Extension specialists, county Extension agents and members of the ranching industry provides an opportunity for youth to learn about the many aspects of ranching.

“We are proud to offer this one-of-a-kind program for the future cattle producers of our state,” said Jon Boren, NMSU College of Agricultural, Consumer and Environmental Sciences associate dean and director of the Extension service.

“What we are finding, from the more than 150 youth who have participated in past ranch camps, is that they have gained a greater appreciation of the science and opportunities in agriculture,” Boren said. “It is also a win-win for our aging agricultural industry with more young people having an interest in going into this type of work.”

During the first four days, the youth compile information necessary to manage a ranch. The college-level hands-on curriculum includes all things beef, marketing and economics, natural resources and range land management.

At the end of each day, one camper receives the Top Hand award for their outstanding participation in that day’s activities.

Each evening they are using that day’s information to design their team’s own ranch management plan, which they present on Friday to a panel of judges from the beef industry and NMSU in competition for the coveted team jacket.

“You don’t have to just be in ranching to attend this camp. It offers a wide variety of career avenues,” Blandford said. “I encourage any youth within the age group to apply.”

The camp is sponsored by NMSU’s College of Agricultural, Consumer and Environmental Sciences, New Mexico Beef Council, New Mexico Cattle Growers’ Association, Cattlegrowers Foundation Inc. and New Mexico Farm and Livestock Bureau, and several beef industry companies.

Mar 05 2018

April Wildfire Preparedness and Mitigation Workshops

Click Here for Flyer

Above is the link for the announcement flyer for the April Wildfire Preparedness and Mitigation Workshops. Each Workshop will be held from 9 a.m. to noon in the morning (dates and locations are below). Topics to be covered include; why wildfires keep getting bigger; finding solutions through collaboration; interagency fire response; post wildfire flooding and what to do after the fire.

If you are interested in attending, please confirm your name, contact information and the date of the workshop you want to attend to: dhsem.localprepared@state.nm.us or 505-476-9682

  • April 17: Aztec, San Juan County Office of Emergency Management, 209 S. Oliver Drive
  • April 23: Hernandez, Hernandez Community Center, 19418 A US-84 (Rio Arriba County)
  • April 24: Las Cruces, Doña Ana County Government Center Rooms #111/113, 845 N. Motel Blvd
  • April 25: Clovis, Carver Library North Annex, 701 N. Main St.
  • April 26: Socorro, Socorro County Office of Emergency Management, 198 Neel Ave

 

 

Mar 05 2018

NMDA accepting livestock scale inspection requests

 

March 2, 2018

New Mexico Department of Agriculture is accepting livestock scale inspection requests through March 31 at no charge

A fee will be assessed after March 31; new inspection program will launch in 2019

(Las Cruces, New Mexico) – If you own a livestock scale in New Mexico, be sure to request an inspection by the New Mexico Department of Agriculture by March 31. If a request is received by March 31, the initial inspection will be provided at no charge to the scale owner, and inspections will be conducted between April 1 and Dec. 31.

A fee will be assessed if the following apply:

  • The request is received after March 31

  • You need your scale inspected sooner than the scheduled inspection date

  • You are unable to have your scale ready for inspection at the scheduled date and time

  • You request an additional inspection in 2018

  • You request a re-inspection in 2018 for a scale that was previously inspected and not in compliance


The fee will be assessed based on the current “fees for weights and measures services” schedule, which may be found at http://www.nmda.nmsu.edu/scs/.

Inspections may be requested by calling 575-646-1616, emailing livestockscale@nmda.nmsu.edu or visiting http://www.nmda.nmsu.edu/scs/licenseregistration/livestock-inspection-registration/.

“A big part of our responsibility here at NMDA is consumer protection and regulatory compliance, and we appreciate livestock scale owners’ cooperation during the inspection process,” said New Mexico Secretary of Agriculture Jeff Witte. “We want to ensure that when an animal is being purchased or sold based on a certain weight, the scale is indeed reflecting the accurate weight.”

The NMDA Standards and Consumer Services Division is responsible for enforcing New Mexico’s weights and measures laws and regulations.

A new livestock scale inspection program takes effect in 2019 and will apply to all scale owners in the state.

“In order to improve our efficiency, we’ll be launching a new routine livestock scale inspection program next year,” said Witte. “We want to give scale owners plenty of notice about the changes.”

To be part of the new program, it will be mandatory for all scale owners to complete and submit the 2019 Routine Livestock Scale Inspection form by Dec. 31, 2018. If scale owners do not want to participate in the new program, they still have the option to call in and request every year by the March 31 deadline. All ranches and farms must maintain current contact information with the NMDA Standards and Consumer Services Division, including names, phone numbers, mailing addresses and, most importantly, email addresses. Email will serve as the main point of communication for future updates, new information and inspector correspondence.

If you have any questions or would like details about the new 2019 Routine Livestock Scale Inspection Program, please call the NMDA Standards and Consumer Services Division at 575-646-1616.

For more information about NMDA, visit www.nmda.nmsu.edu. Like us on Facebook www.facebook.com/NMDeptAg and follow us on Twitter @NMDeptAg.

 

 

New Mexico Department of Agriculture’s Lorenzo Mireles prepares to lower weights onto a livestock scale east of Las Cruces. Mireles and other NMDA weights and measures inspectors have the responsibility of routinely testing all livestock scales in the state to ensure their accuracy. (Photo by Pamela Sanchez, New Mexico Department of Agriculture)

 

New Mexico Department of Agriculture’s Lorenzo Mireles inspects a livestock scale east of Las Cruces. Mireles and other NMDA weights and measures inspectors have the responsibility of routinely testing all livestock scales in the state to ensure their accuracy. (Photo by Pamela Sanchez, New Mexico Department of Agriculture)

 

Media Contact:

Kristie Garcia, Public Information Officer,

New Mexico Department of Agriculture

575-646-2804, krgarcia@nmda.nmsu.edu

 

 

Feb 28 2018

Cattle Growers Present Scholarships

Cutline: Makayla Andrews accepts her scholarship award from Denton Dowell, Young Cattlemen’s Leadership Committee (YCLC) Chairman.

 Four New Mexico students – Makayla Andrews, Peralta; Kellan Bennett, Hope; Kasyn Creighton,

Elida; and John Davis, Springer; received college scholarships from the New Mexico Cattle Growers Association (NMCGA) during the recent Joint Stockmen’s Convention held in Albuquerque.

            “We are very proud of these young men and women, and wish them they best as they continue their education and careers,” said Tom Sidwell, NMCGA President, Tucumcari.  “We want to congratulate them on their accomplishments, and look forward to hearing about their future successes.”

            Andrews received a $500 scholarship.  After graduating from Valencia High School in May, Andrews plans to attend college and major in forensic psychology and hopes to eventually work for the FBI.  She is active in the National Honor Society, has received an academic letter each of her first three years in high school, and has received departmental academic awards in agricultural mechanics, mathematics and cosmetology.  Andrews is also an active member of both 4-H and FFA, and has served as an officer in both organizations as well as participating in judging contests, competing in shooting sports, and showing pigs and cattle.  She is the daughter of Michael and Shonda Andrews.

            Kellan Bennett received a $1500 scholarship. She is a 2017 graduate of Artesia High School and majoring in agriculture business with a minor in communications at Clarendon College where she is also a member of the livestock judging team.  While in high school, she was active in cross country and track, the National Honor Society and FFA, where she participated in various judging and speech contests and served as an officer.  The former New Mexico Senior Beef Ambassador grew up on her family’s ranch, and after completing her education hopes to play an active role in the agriculture industry.  She is the daughter of Michael and Emily Bennett. 

            Kasyn Creighton received a $1500 scholarship.  Creighton is a senior at Elida High School, where she is a member of the volleyball, basketball, cheer and track teams, National Honor Society and Fellowship of Christian Athletes.  She is also active in 4-H, currently serving as the New Mexico State 4-H Secretary and FFA, where she serves as the District IV Secretary.  In addition, Creighton and her sister have their own herd commercial black and Charolais cross cattle. After graduating, she plans to pursue a degree in agricultural business and economics at New Mexico State University, then return home to play an active role in her family’s feed, and farm and ranch supply store. She is the daughter of Garland and Leslie Creighton.

            John Davis received a $500 scholarship.  Davis is a homeschooled student, and will graduate from High School in May.  He plans to attend Bethlehem Bible College to obtain a bible and theology degree, before studying animal science at New Mexico State University and hopes to use that knowledge as an agricultural missionary.  In high school, he has been active in 4-H on the local and county level, Teenpact Leadership School, Awana Youth Ministries as a member and youth leader, the Follow the Son Bible Club, the Springer Christian Community Choir and Las Cruces Presbyterian Choir.  Davis, who was raised on his family ranch in northeastern New Mexico, was also the 2017-2018 New Mexico Junior Beef Ambassador.  He is the son of Bruce and Trina Davis.   

This year because of the help of sponsors like Purina Animal Nutrition; Purina dealers Bunks Feed Barn, Hobbs; Circle S Feed Store, Carlsbad; Cortese Feed Supply, Ft. Sumner; Creighton’s Town & Country, Portales; Dickson Implement Co., Tucumcari; Gary & Ginger Creighton, Portales; Horse N Hound Livestock & Farm Supply, Las Cruces; and the NMCGA Allied Industries Committee and Young Cattlemen’s Leadership Committee, the NMCGA was able to award four scholarships totaling $4000 to New Mexico students.

“College gets a little more expensive each year, and at the same time, the economy seems to get a little tighter.  With this scholarship, we hope to help ease that burden,” Sidwell said.  “We truly appreciate the help of our sponsors.”  

            The NMCGA has represented the beef industry in New Mexico and the West since 1914 and has members in all 33 of the state’s counties as well as some 19 other states. The Association participates in venues necessary to protect beef producers and private property rights including litigation, state and federal legislation and regulatory affairs. 

 

For further information, contact:  Caren Cowan

505.247.0584 phone / nmcga@nmagriculture.org email

 

Feb 28 2018

Cattle Growers Honor Ray Keller at Convention

 

 

Cutline: Ray Keller (left) accepts his award from former NMCGA President Pat Boone. 

Ray Keller, Carlsbad, received the 2017 Ayudando Siempre Alli Award from the New Mexico Cattle Growers Association (NMCGA) at the Joint Stockmen’s Convention, recently held in Albuquerque.

“We truly appreciate the work that Ray has put into improving landscapes in southeastern New Mexico,” said Tom Sidwell, NMCGA President, Quay.  “He helped bring together landowners, local businesses and industry, land management agencies, private organizations and state and local officials work cooperatively on invasive species control, and much has been accomplished.  Ray’s ability to lead by example has inspired industry, agencies as well as landowners to improve stewardship of the lands that we all depend upon.”

Keller, who will soon retire from the Carlsbad office of the Bureau of Land Management (BLM), spearheaded the Restore New Mexico program that put funds from the National Resource Conservation Service’s (NRCS) EQIP program together with private dollars to change the face of the landscape of southeastern New Mexico. Over the years, he has worked with more than 300 partners including Soil & Water Conservation Districts in several counties in New Mexico and groups including the New Mexico Association of Conservation Districts (NMACD), CEHMM (Center of Excellence), the Wild Turkey Federation, New Mexico State University, Dow Chemical, the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, NRCS, Watershed Alliance, Bureau of Reclamation, Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, and the New Mexico Highway Department.      

Through his efforts, over 3 million acres have been treated with programs ranging from invasive species control – mesquite, cat-claw/creosote, and shin-oak; noxious weed treatment – African Rue, Malta Star-thistle, salt cedar; and restoration and reclamation – including abandoned well pads, caliche pits and oil field roads. 

            Keller worked cooperatively with the Carlsbad Soil and Water Conservation District (SWCD) as well as other State and Federal agencies to treat and eradicate salt cedar and Russian olive infestations along the Pecos River, the Delaware River, and the Black River.  His efforts and multiple year work with an in-house crew resulted in the Delaware River receiving a National Riparian award from the American Fisheries Society.  In addition, he laid the ground work for all the Federal lands in Eddy County along the Pecos River to be aerially sprayed in the fall of 2003. 

“Nearly every day one or more of our members are interacting with US Forest Service or Bureau of Land Management staff on a wide variety of challenges and opportunities from regulations to restoration and enhancement of these lands,” Sidwell noted.  “The results of Ray Keller’s hard work, and willingness to work with anyone who was interested in helping are visible and ongoing today.  It’s a great example of how relationships between land management agencies and others should work, and we’re glad to have the opportunity to say thank you.” 

The Ayudando Siempre Alli Award (Always There Helping) is given by the Association each year to an individual who has given of their time and talents on behalf of the industry, but is not necessarily actively involved in cattle production.  Some years, the winner is a NMCGA member, but often they are not.  Past winners include bankers, elected officials, an attorney, an artist, a publisher, state legislators and other agricultural organizations.  The award is sponsored by Farmway Feed Mills, Las Vegas, NM.

“There are countless people behind – and sometimes in front – of the scenes who support and make the work of the New Mexico Cattle Growers’ Association possible,” Boone pointed out.  “These people come from all walks of life and all sorts of careers but they all care about ranchers and our families. Some of them we have known forever, others are newer friends, but they all give of themselves for our benefit — they are always there.”

The NMCGA has represented the beef industry in New Mexico and the West since 1914 and has members in all 33 of the state’s counties as well as some 14 other states. The Association participates in venues necessary to protect beef producers and private property rights including litigation, state and federal legislation and regulatory affairs.  

For further information, contact:  Caren Cowan

505.247.0584 phone / nmcga@nmagriculture.org email

 

Multimin Health